Things to See

  1. A Hiking Overview

    View all Hiking

    Hiking trails are plentiful the length and breadth of Lincoln County – Oregon’s Central Coast, from Cascade Head to Cape Perpetua and throughout the Siuslaw National Forest. Some of the best hikes worthy of note: Three Rocks Road at the Cascade Head Natural Area near Lincoln City,…

  2. Alsea Bay and River

    This coastal estuary boasts excellent sites for bird watching and marine wildlife viewing, with crabbing and fishing as main draws for boaters in Alsea Bay. Numerous public docks, marinas and riverfront restaurants line the Alsea River along Highway 34.

  3. Beachcombing

    With miles and miles of open, public beaches, the Central Oregon Coast provides excellent beachcombing opportunities especially after our winter storms and during the seasons with the highest tides.  Floats to agates, driftwood to shells, your souvenir collection will expand after every walk on the beach.

  4. Biking

    Bicycling The Central Oregon Coast has long been a destination for cyclists from all over the world, making their way up or down the coast along Highway 101. Trips from the cities in the Willamette Valley are also popular and may be done overnight. The Oregon Department of Transportation publishes…

  5. Birding

    The Central Oregon Coast is home to more than 300 species of birds, ranging from bald eagles and peregrin falcon to numerous songbirds to more than 13 species of seabirds that include tufted puffin, common murre,and rhinoceros auklet. Habitats include tidal estuaries, island, rivers and and streams, fields and pastures,…

  6. Cape Foulweather Scenic Viewpoint

    Cape Foulweather was discoverd and named in 1778 by the famous British navigator Captain James Cook.  It was at this Point that Captain Cook first sighted the mainland of North America on the Pacific Coast, and one of the sudden storms which greeted his arrival almost put an end…

  7. Cape Perpetua

    The highest point on the Oregon coast (at 803 feet), Cape Perpetua, has both historic and natural significance. The visitor center, hiking trails and overlook drive provide spectacular views (up to 150 miles on a clear day) of the coastline and its lush coast forests.

  8. Cascade Head

    A visit by car or with backpack is long remembered after experiencing the vistas, the forests and the wildlife of Cascade Head. This designated natural area is home to more than 250 species of birds and mammals. The lower hiking trails wind through a Hemlock forest before opening to old…

  9. Chitwood Bridge

    This is the first covered bridge to be restored in Lincoln County and it is named for the community of Chitwood, which is named for its founder, Joshua Chitwood. The bridge was originally built in 1933 and has a Howe Truss that is 96 feet long. It spans the Lower…

  10. Clamming on the Oregon Coast

    ClammingClam diggings is one of Oregon’s most popular outdoor activities.  It is a family activity that can be enjoyed by all ages.  All you need are adequate boots and clothing, a bucket, a clam shovel or rake, a shellfish license, and a copy of the current Oregon Sport Fishing Regulations.…

  11. Cleft of the Rock

    View all Lighthouses

    Nestled in the northern shadows of Cape Perpetua on a bluff overlooking the ocean sits a neat A-frame structure attached to a lighthouse. It is the home of Jim Gibbs, former U.S. Coast Guardsman, lighthouse keeper, and noted author and historian. Gibbs, author of 21 maritime books, is considered an…

  12. Crabbing on the Coast

    The Oregon coast provides many opportunities for sport crabbing.  Crabbing is a year-round activity that can be enjoyed by all members of the family and almost always yields a successful trip.Crabbing requires minimal gear, which is often available for rent in most coastal towns.  While crabbing from a boat increases…

  13. Depoe Bay Area Hikes (6 Hikes)

    View all Hiking

    Depoe Bay Walk Length: 6.25m/10kDifficulty: Easy to ModerateOther: Bikes – check trailhead postingFees: NoDescription: This walk is a loop divided into three parts that starts at Gracie’s Sea Hag Restaurant on Hwy 101 and returns to Gracie’s. A map with instructions is available at the Depoe Bay Chamber of Commerce. East Loop Length:…

  14. Devils Lake

    This three-mile long, 678-acre freshwater lake offers many recreational activities as an alternative to the beach. Located in Lincoln City upstream from the ‘D’ River — the world’s shortest — Devils Lake gained its name from Native American folklore. A popular spot for fishing, water skiing and swimming. Rental kayaks,…

  15. Dining Al Fresco – From the Bay to your Bucket

    State Ranger Cameron Rauenhorst, known affectionately as Ranger Clameron, grins as he holds up a BIG shell. A seven-inch neck protrudes from the shell and Clameron tells us that fully extended the neck can be nearly three feet long. Known as a Gaper, Horse, Horseneck, Blue, or Empire clam, this…

  16. Drift Creek Bridge

    One of the four covered wooden bridges near the Oregon central coast, the Drift Creek Bridge, also may also be the most famous. For starters it, well, doesn’t span Drift Creek. At least it doesn’t anymore. If you believe in miracles you should get acquainted with this bridge. It…

  17. Feeding and Diving Whale Facts

    Gray gray whales are baleen whales.  This means when feeding for small crustaceans on the ocean floor, the whales roll on their sides and scoop up water and sediments.  They then force the water and sediments out through the fringed baleen plates that hang from either side of their upper…

  18. Fisher School (Five Rivers) Bridge

    Built in 1919, this bridge has a Howe Truss and is 72 feet long. The last of Lincoln County’s covered bridges to be restored, the Fisher bridge was formally rededicated on June 4, 2005. This time there were federal and state transportation funds available for the project, which came to…

  19. Fishing

    Comes in two sizes — Ocean and FreshwaterThe Central Oregon Coast is well known for the commercial and charter fishing fleets at Newport and Depoe Bay. Deep-sea salmon and halibut fishing have always been king on the coast, but conservation-restricted seasons have shifted the focus to bottom fishing (sea trout,…

  20. Golfing

    There are five golf courses in the county, offering sports challenges to all levels of play. Golfing is another year-round activity on the Central Oregon Coast, particularly for those who appreciate the winter rains. Golf courses are located in Lincoln City, Gleneden Beach, Waldport, Toledo and Newport.

1 - 20 of 50 Things to See